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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10059/420
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Title: Inspirational tales: propagating the entrepreneurial narrative amongst children.
Authors: Smith, Robert
Editors: Bygrave, William D.
Keywords: Entrepreneurship
Narrative
Issue Date: 2002
Publisher: Babson College Center for Entrepreneurship
Citation: SMITH, ROBERT, 2002. Inspirational tales: propagating the entrepreneurial narrative amongst children. In: WILLIAM D. BYGRAVE et al., eds. Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2002: Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference. 2002. Babson Park, Massachusetts: Babson College Center for Entrepreneurship.
Abstract: Many entrepreneurial narratives act as inspirational tales, propagating valued stories at an ideological and mythological level. By participating in them we expose others to the inspirational power of the narrative and encourage the process of emulation. Potential outcomes include the perpetuation and regeneration of core ideological elements. Exposure to narrative is a process of social construction and re-construction that begins in childhood. Yet, entrepreneurship is essentially an adult paradigm. Consequentially, children may be channeled into individual occupations whereby few emerge as entrepreneurs. Unless one is exposed to the power of the entrepreneurial narrative, as a result of familial fables, or by being raised in an entrepreneurial family then by the time one makes a choice to pursue an entrepreneurial career path - life styles and alternative career paths are already established. The entrepreneurial narrative thus eludes the children. This is obviously detrimental to both society and the individual. This paper describes action-based research to address the problem.
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