OpenAIR OpenAIR
 
 

OpenAIR @ RGU >
Business >
Communication, Marketing & Media >
Journal articles (Communication, Marketing & Media) >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10059/425
This item has been viewed 30 times in the last year. View Statistics

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Halsall culture and organization 2008.pdf158.73 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: From ‘business culture’ to ‘brand state’: conceptions of nation and culture in business literature on cultural difference.
Authors: Halsall, Robert
Keywords: Business
Culture
Neo-liberalism
Teleology
Brand state
Issue Date: Mar-2008
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: HALSALL, R., 2008. From ‘business culture’ to ‘brand state’: conceptions of nation and culture in business literature on cultural difference. In: Culture and Organization, 14 (1), pp. 15-30.
Abstract: This article examines changing conceptions of culture and nation in business literature from the early 1990s to the present. In the early 1990s the growth of literature concerned with depicting the cultural differences between national varieties of capitalism and business systems seemingly betokened an interest in diversity in the business world. This seeming interest in cultural diversity, however, concealed an implicit neo-liberal teleology which implies a convergence hypothesis and change in the cultural role of the nation state to that of a ‘location manager’, whose role is merely to guarantee favourable conditions for business with the minimum of state intervention. This reconceptualisation of the nation leads to the ultimate stage in this teleology, the discourse of the ‘brand state’, in which ‘culture’ is seen as just equivalent to those aspects of a country’s ‘brand equity’ which meet the requirements of instant recognisability to the outside world.
ISSN: 1475-9551
1477-2760
Appears in Collections:Journal articles (Communication, Marketing & Media)

All items in OpenAIR are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved.

 

 
   Disclaimer | Freedom of Information | Privacy Statement |Copyright ©2012 Robert Gordon University, Schoolhill, Aberdeen, AB10 1FR, Scotland, UK: a Scottish charity, registration No. SCO13781