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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10059/463
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Title: And they say don't work with children...
Authors: Bremner, Pauline
Keywords: Children
Role
Artwork
Qualitative
Marketing research
Issue Date: Jul-2008
Publisher: Robert Gordon University
Citation: BREMNER, P., 2008. And they say don’t work with children..... In: Reflective Marketing in a Material World: Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Annual Conference 2008. 8-10 July 2008. Aberdeen: Robert Gordon University.
Abstract: This paper explores the role and method a researcher must consider when using children as research objects. Three areas are discussed; the researcher’s role, children as research objects and the results and conclusions. Researchers must consider an appropriate role when researching with children with the most advocated being the “least adult role”, as there are suggestions that children do not make good respondents. A suitable methodological approach has to be taken allowing children to be creative and to ensure effective responses. ‘Doing artwork’ combined with questions provided creative responses. Four drawing sessions were conducted with preschool children from two nurseries. The aim of these sessions was to identify if the children could actually complete drawings, state who had given the gift to them and pictorially represent what they thought of the giver. The pictorial results were coded and the results identified that as all children produced a drawing ‘doing artwork’ is an acceptable methodological approach for this group of respondents. A majority could remember who had given them a gift, but could not present their feelings of the gift giver pictorially suggesting that children may not be suitable respondents overall.
Appears in Collections:Conference publications (Communication, Marketing & Media)

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