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Title: A new generation of biocides for control of crustacea in fish farms.
Authors: Robertson, Peter K. J.
Black, Kenneth D.
Adams, Morgan
Willis, Kate
Buchan, Fraser
Orr, Heather
Lawton, Linda A.
McCullagh, Cathy
Keywords: Methylene blue
Nuclear fast red
Photosensitiser
Toxicity
Sea lice
Copepods
Issue Date: Apr-2009
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: ROBERTSON, P. K. J., BLACK, K. D., ADAMS, M., WILLIS, K., BUCHAN, F., ORR, H., LAWTON, L. and McCULLAGH, C., 2009. A new generation of biocides for control of crustacea in fish farms. Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B: Biology, 95 (1), pp. 58-63.
Abstract: Farming of salmon has become a significant industry in many countries over the past two decades. A major challenge facing this sector is infestation of the salmon by sea lice. The main way of treating salmon for such infestations is the use of medicines such as organophosphates, pyrethrins, hydrogen peroxide or benzoylphenyl ureas. The use of these medicines in fish farms is, however, highly regulated due to concerns about contamination of the wider marine environment. In this paper we report the use of photochemically active biocides for the treatment of a marine copepod, which is a model of parasitic sea lice. Photochemical activation and subsequent photodegradation of PDAs may represent a controllable and environmentally benign option for control of these parasites or other pest organisms in aquaculture.
ISSN: 1011-1344
Appears in Collections:Journal articles (Pharmacy & Life Sciences)

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