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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10059/783
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Title: Thinking around abdominal obesity and cardiovascular risk.
Authors: Broom, Iain
Keywords: Abdominal obesity
Metabolic syndrome
Visceral fat
Waist circumference
Cardiometabolic risk
Issue Date: Mar-2006
Publisher: SAGE Publications.
Citation: BROOM, I., 2006. Thinking around abdominal obesity and cardiovascular risk. British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease, 6 (2), pp. 58-61.
Abstract: Obesity, particularly abdominal (visceral) obesity, is a burden on healthcare systems worldwide and is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, metabolic syndrome, inflammation and thrombosis. Excess visceral fat is associated with an increased risk of CVD. A reliable indicator for visceral fat is waist circumference (WC), which is strongly associated with all-cause mortality. One of the central debates is how does obesity cause CVD. A key hypothesis is that pro-inflammatory adipokines released by adipocytes play a causal role in the development of the pathologies that are associated with insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes and CVD. Although current drug therapies for the treatment of obesity induce weight loss, there is still a need for new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of abdominal obesity. A new class of compounds, cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) blockers, is currently under development for the treatment of obesity and shows promising preliminary clinical results.
ISSN: 1474-6514
Appears in Collections:Journal articles (Centre for Obesity Research and Epidemiology)

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