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dc.contributor.authorPrice, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Paul
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Anne
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-03T15:10:50Z
dc.date.available2014-07-03T15:10:50Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.identifier.citationPRICE, J., HARRIS, P. and DOUGLAS, A. 2013. Values and assumptions in the concept of cultural leadership. In Proceedings of the 1st European confernce on arts and humanities 2013 [ECAH 2013]: connectedness, identity and alienation, 18-21 July 2013, Brighton, UK. Nagoya, Japan: International Academic Forum [online], pages 398-412. Available from: http://www.iafor.org/archives/offprints/ecah2013-offprints/ECAH2013_0490.pdfen
dc.identifier.issn2188-1111en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10059/986
dc.description.abstractCultural leadership is still a young concept in cultural policy and academic study. Emerging as a sectoral concern in the UK around 2002, its early development as both practice and discourse took place during a time of notable growth and optimism for the cultural sector, despite being rooted in a perceived crisis of institutional management. It has developed into a training and development agenda of international significance. Changes in economic and political circumstances over the past three years have dramatically altered the context in which cultural leaders operate. This is to some extent reflected in the terminological shift towards “resilience” in recent initiatives. However, the largely economistic foundation of cultural leadership discourse remains unchallenged, with a continuing emphasis on achieving well-run cultural businesses and sustainable structures. This paper reconsiders cultural leadership‟s history as a live topic in the policy arena and questions the sufficiency of the values which continue to underpin it. It argues that the key site of crisis for cultural leaders has shifted from organisational governance to the social, ethical and aesthetic demands of an emerging political era, the nature of which cultural leaders must themselves play a role in shaping. These issues are explored through interviews with artists, producers and cultural activists, while the assumptions of cultural leadership discourse are considered with reference to key literature and research. A more complex and critical approach to cultural leadership is proposed, demanding dynamic responses from policy makers and practitioners alike.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIAFOR (The International Academic Forum)en
dc.relation.ispartofThe Inaugural European Conference on Arts & Humanities 2013: Conference Proceedingsen
dc.rightsCopyright : IAFOR. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) You are free to: Share— copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format; Adapt— remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially. Under the following terms: Attribution — You must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. You may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use; No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.en
dc.titleValues and assumptions in the concept of cultural leadership.en
dc.typeConference publicationsen
dc.publisher.urihttp://www.iafor.org/archives/offprints/ecah2013-offprints/ECAH2013_0490.pdfen
dc.date.end2014-01-08


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